Category Archives: News

Say hello to Sam, our new content delivery manager

Sam Carney - Content Delivery Manager

Sam Carney – Content Delivery Manager

Hi folks! I’m Sam and I’d like to introduce myself as the newest addition to the Copify team.

I will be joining the team as a content delivery manager, having completed an 11-week internship through the Santander Internship Programme.

I’m originally from Preston, but I spent three years studying English Literature and Creative Writing at Lancaster University.

Since graduating last July (has it really been that long?), I’ve pulled pints at my Dad’s pub, packed parcels for a computer parts company and planned a pre-entry programme for autistic students with Lancaster University Student Services.

It was during the latter placement that I came by the opportunity to work for Copify. I applied for the position through the university, and I’ve spent the last two-and-a-bit months in the Copify office, moderating and editing content, supporting writers and clients, drinking excellent coffee and listening to BBC Radio 6 Music. I will now be taking up my position on a permanent basis at the end of the month.

Writing has always been a great passion of mine, and I spent much of last summer pursuing work experience opportunities in journalism. I packed a great deal into week-long placements at the Lancashire Evening Post and Deadline News agency in Edinburgh, but the cherry on top of a glorious summer was undoubtedly the time I spent at FourFourTwo in London, where I was afforded the opportunity to write a feature and interview Sky Sports News presenter and transfer deadline day supremo, Jim White.

The Sir Tom Finney Stadium - home of the great Bamber Bridge FC!

The Sir Tom Finney Stadium – home of the great Bamber Bridge FC!

I’m a big football fan and I do quite a bit of writing on the subject in my spare time. I’m currently match reporter for my local non-league side, Bamber Bridge FC, who play at the eighth tier of the football pyramid. I also have my own blog, and have written for popular original football writing sites, These Football Times and In Bed With Maradona.

As you might be able to guess from my degree choice, I like to relax with a good book. American literature and dystopian fiction are my preferred genres, and Cormac McCarthy and George Orwell are my favourite authors. My favourite book? Catch 22 – I read it once a year!

I did enjoy my trip to the Guinness Storehouse!

I did enjoy my trip to the Guinness Storehouse!

I love visiting different places on holiday and sampling vibrant, new experiences; a few Guinness’s in the backstreet pubs of Dublin, a visit to the ruin bars of Budapest and a trip to Tenerife’s Siam Park, Europe’s biggest waterpark, were personal highlights of 2014!

I also enjoy learning new things, which is probably for the best; as a Copify moderator, you never know what you’re going to be asked to read through and edit!

Is your ecommerce site ready for the new PCI Data Security Standards?


If you process card payments, read on…

In April 2015, The PCI Security Standards Council released version 3.1 of its “Requirements and Security Assessment” procedures.

The new document, which has outlined the minimum security standards for online stores since 2008, will be familiar to any ecommerce business processing card payments via their website.

In the aftermath of recent SSL vulnerabilities, mainly the BEAST and CRIME exploits, the way in which your server processes HTTPS requests is now under scrutiny.

The good ol’ trusty lock symbol you see in your browser’s address bar when you access a secure page, is no longer an indication your data is encrypted to the new PCI standards.

I have a SSL certificate, does this still affect me?


When you visit a “secure” page on the internet using HTTPS, the method in which the data you send and receive is encrypted will depend on your operating system, and browser.

If you’re using the most up-to-date version of Google Chrome, then most likely your request uses the secure TLSv1.2 protocol. However, if you’re using an older version of Opera or Internet Explorer, you may be using a potentially weaker protocol such as SSLv2.

What’s new in PCI 3.1?

The latest round of requirements in the PCI DSS document state the following;

SSL and early TLS are not considered strong cryptography and cannot be used as a security control after 30th June, 2016.

The SSLv2, SSLv3 and TLSv1.0 protocols are all now considered non-compliant, and if your site is subject to a regular PCI DSS scan, and you still support these protocols, you will see these issues being raised very soon.

How the browsers stack up

Internet Explorer breaks the internet. Again.

Internet Explorer breaks the internet. Again.

What’s most worrying about the new standards, is how far behind browser support is for the new PCI compliant protocols.

At some point soon, you’re going to have to make a very difficult decision: Do I comply with the PCI guidelines even if this means losing customers who use older browsers?

Quite simply, by disabling TLSv1.0, any customers using one of the following browsers would not be able to access the secure pages of your website;

Browser Oldest version not to support TLSv1.1
Google Chrome 22.00
Google Android OS Browser Android 5.0
Mozilla Firefox 24.00
Microsoft Internet Explorer 10.00
Microsoft Internet Explorer Mobile 10.00 Mobile
Opera 9.00
Apple Safari 7.00
Apple Safari mobile iOS 5
Google Chrome 22.00
Google Chrome 22.00

That’s right folks, to remain PCI compliant users on browsers as late as Internet Explorer 10 will no longer be able to access your site. Eeek!

How to disable non-PCI protocols

If you’re not on managed hosting, configuring your webserver to only accept TLSv1.1 or above is quite straight forward. On Apache 2.4 for example, simply remove unwanted protocols using the ‘-‘ option in your config directive;

SSLProtocol All -SSLv2 -SSLv3 -TLSv1

We hope this helps! If you’re unsure of your website’s current setup and whether you might be falling foul of the new PCI guidelines, try the handy tool over at SSL Labs.

CC Images by Perspecsys Photos and Andreas Åkre Solberg

Startup Stories – Julian Bradley of

The internet has opened up a world of opportunities for people to make a living by sharing their talentJulian Bradley 2 color online.

One such person is my friend and fellow Lancaster graduate Julian Bradley. In the latest of our Startup Stories, he shares some fantastic insight into his business and his life as an LA-based jazz pianist.

Q) Tell us a little bit about yourself, how did you become a jazz pianist?

A) My name’s Julian Bradley, I’m a music education specialist, born in England, now living in Los Angeles. I studied music at undergrad and masters level, and was lucky to have several world class music teachers. After seeing a Wynton Marsalis concert aged 17, I became obsessed with jazz piano, and went on to read every book I could find on the subject.

Q) Talk us through a typical day in your life…

A) I’m very type A, and most days I work long hours. Most of my time is focussed on lesson filming, or video editing. I have a studio setup exclusively for filming jazz piano lessons – the piano, camera, microphone and lighting are always setup, so I can film anytime. The video editing I’ll do at a coffee shop. Aside from my work, health and fitness are important to me. I play sport daily, and try to travel often, since my occupation now allows me to do so. I try to leave LA every few weeks on a 3 day road trip with my wife or friends, and keep a fresh perspective on what I’m working towards.

Q) Can you tell us how the website got started, where did the idea come from?

A) My youtube channel was started as a side project. I had no intention of making income from it. My mother-in-law had lent me a book, which talked about ‘giving back’. I realized that I’d never given anything to anyone without wanting something in return, and that I should try giving something. I’d been learning a lot from youtube on various topics, and it occurred to me that the one thing I probably could explain better than most would be jazz piano, having read so many books on the subject. I spent a Sunday afternoon filming 3 lessons at the piano. I uploaded the videos on youtube, and pretty much forgot about them. A month later, I needed to login to the email I’d used to setup the account, and was surprised to see over 50 emails from youtube notifying me of new subscribers to my channel, which seemed like a strong sign of interest, especially compared to my ‘composer showreel’ I’d posted a year prior, which had only received 100 views (mostly from me).

A few months later, I emigrated to California, where my wife is from originally. I was unable to work for the first 5 months, while waiting for my green card to be processed. I had to do something productive with that time, and decided to make more jazz lessons and see where it took me. Simultaneously, I started reading about online income, and I gradually started pushing myself to get comfortable charging money for some material.


Julian Bradley – Jazz Pianist

First I became a ‘YouTube partner’ and remember the amazing feeling of earning $3 on the first day! Then I pushed myself to add a PayPal donate button (it felt awkward because I had genuinely made my videos without any financial incentive). In the first week I received 2 donations, which made me realise that some viewers probably wanted to pay for something – I just hadn’t given them anything to buy yet. So I created a $10 ebook to test the water, and announced it at the end of one of my lessons. It sold. Then I spent a month creating a $30 bigger ebook, and announced it. It sold. Then I did the same again for a $50 ebook, and it sold. Now I’m venturing into larger products, including membership to my new ear training course which I’ll be launching next month. I’m continuing to increase my comfort zone when it comes to charging for products, valuing my skills, and raising prices. After all, it’s entirely down to me to make the video making sustainable. Only by charging for some material can I continue to make future videos. No one else is going to make it happen.

Q) Can you explain your business model?

A) I make a free video lesson for a commonly searched topic, e.g. ‘tritone substitution’. I’ll aim to make the best lesson of all time on that topic. I’ll end that video with a call to action – ‘if you enjoyed this video and want even more in-depth material, click on the link below to find out about my Jazz Theory ebook…’

Q) Do you outsource any work, if so what, how and why?

A) Currently I work with a website developer who creates my subscription websites (while I make the lesson content). But my goal is to outsource all tasks that are not within my skill set – I should only be focussed on making videos, and educational products – teaching is my strength, so I’m in the process of outsourcing all other tasks such as customer service, audio mixing, and possibly some of the video editing.

Q) How have you funded the business?

A) I probably went full-time with my business a bit early. There was a stressful 12 month period – I’d released my $30 ebook, and found myself having to post a new lesson every Friday just to generate enough sales over the weekend to pay bills and high living costs in LA. I was working incredibly hard, all the time, and only breaking even. And living in LA away from my family meant there was no safety net. I couldn’t even afford a flight home during that time. My friends who had regular jobs seemed to be relaxing every evening, and I turned down a lot of invites to social events during that time.

Ultimately, there came a point when several large bills were all coinciding – several thousand dollars were due for an immigration service, rent, health insurance, and some essential car repairs. I had just 2 weeks to think of a solution, and even contemplated walking people’s dogs and mowing lawns. I knew the answer lay in my youtube audience, which was putting me in contact with far more people than I could ever meet in person – 4000 daily views and 30,000 subscribers. I decided to write a complete book on jazz theory… from scratch. I completed ‘Jazz Theory Explained’ in 2 weeks – 100 pages of writing, image creation, links to relevant videos – everything. The imminent deadline really focussed me, I couldn’t be a perfectionist, and that book has turned out to be my most popular book by far. Not only did I pay off the imminent bills, I made several thousand dollars extra profit, completely unexpected. I realized that actually, my first book had been a failure in comparison. I’d been promoting something that most people weren’t interested in. Since writing ‘Jazz Theory Explained’ book, I’ve been much more relaxed financially, and now I’m able to enjoy my work and maintain a healthy balanced lifestyle.

Q) How much competition is there in your space? How do you stand out?

A) There’s certainly plenty of music tuition online. My content is far more advanced than any other I’ve seen. For a while I thought maybe I’d do better if I covered more basic subjects, for a wider audience. So I tried some beginner lessons but found that my advanced material is far more popular – which is good because that’s the stuff I’m interested in.


Jazz hero Wynton Marsalis

Q) What does your typical customer look like? How do you keep them engaged?

A) Most of my audience are retiring men, who have worked in a non-music career for many years. Only now are they able to explore their passion for music / jazz with the time needed. That said, I also have many younger viewers, mostly piano players and guitarists.

Q) What customer recruitment channels are you using, and which are the most effective in terms of conversion?

A) Currently, my traffic comes entirely from my ‘how to’ videos. I only make a video if it’s a searched for topic, and then I gradually ask the viewer to subscribe, watch another video, join my email list, or buy a book, and so on. I will be venturing into SEO and paid advertising with the launch of my more expensive ear training course.

Q) What have been your major hurdles when starting up, how have you overcome them?

A) The biggest mountain to climb has been creating my ear training course. What I naively thought would take me one month, has now taken 12 months to complete. I’ve learnt that any creative project I start seems to turn out to be 10 times more work than I imagine, at least. So from now on, if a project seems like a lot of work to begin with, then I don’t take it on (unless I have a team). Small projects turn out to be big projects, and big projects turn out to be absolutely huge projects… so now I stick to small projects (which are actually big projects).

Q) Who has inspired you in working for yourself/starting your business?

A) I had a good friend at university, who was very clever, but lacked discipline. I could never imagine him in a regular job – he’d just never turn up on time. I was out of touch with him after graduation, but met him 3 years later. He told me he’d partnered with a friend, and developed their own SEO software, which they used to keep their website ranking #1 on google. Their website was selling an expensive product and taking commission, and they’d been traveling the world for 12 months, returning with more money than they’d left with. His story is what planted the seed in my mind of what’s possible online, and that’s when I started researching online income streams and making a living online.

Q) What would be your advice be to anybody looking to make money from sharing their talents online?

A) Make lots of quick experiments and see what sticks. Don’t make the mistakes I made – being a perfectionist in the early stages. You never know which things are going to take off, and which will fail. The best approach is to set a short time limit on each small experiment you try (a blog post, a how to video, a podcast, etc), and then see which takes off – then follow up with more of that.

Q) What are your tips for startups who need help with getting stuff done?

A) I’m always conscious of the 80/20 principle – 80% of the results are generated from 20% of activities. I’m always doing an 80/20 analysis of my life – what are the 20% of activities which generate the most growth in my business and ultimately, income? In my case, it’s video making, and product making. I could easily get distracted with social media, playing around with WordPress, or replying to every single email, but in my case, these are not income generating activities, and I should not be spending much time doing these. The other rule I bear in mind, is that ‘work expands to fill the time available’. So I try to impose time limits on myself always – this might be going to the coffee shop to work without taking my power adapter, forcing me to finish the video editing before my battery runs out.

Q) What are your long-term plans for the business?

A) There’s many ways I could go with what I’m doing, but mostly I let the audience drive what happens next. I survey my audience regularly (through I’m always trying to find out what people struggle with the most (musically!), what keeps them up at night, and then to solve that pain. That’s what lead me to tackle ear training – it was the most requested topic in every survey, so I’ve created an ear training course. I’ll continue to survey my viewers, and create new content, products and services based on their feedback.

Meet Cat, our new content delivery manager

Cat Huntinton

Cat Huntington

Hey everyone! I’m Cat and I’m the latest member of the Copify team.

As a content delivery manager I will be moderating and editing content. I’ll also be helping to address client and writer enquiries.

I was born and raised in Lancaster, so I know all about the area around Copify’s office. However, I have spent the last six years away from home.

First I headed down south to study Business and Japanese at university. As part of my studies I spent one year on exchange in Tokyo, which quickly became my favourite city on earth. I loved it so much that I went back immediately after graduating to teach English.

While in Tokyo I became interested in startups and found a position as a web project manager for a Tokyo city guide website. After a couple of years in Japan, I was determined to continue my startup career, so I moved to Berlin, to do a content marketing and marketing intelligence internship for – an online rental marketplace.

Between years at university, I spent a few months in Los Angeles, doing an internship at a subtitling and dubbing company. This was where my interest in editing started. This interest grew when I worked on the Tokyo city guide website, where I was responsible for website planning and content management. The best part about it was coordinating freelancers and editing articles. I’m excited to develop these skills further at Copify and use my existing content management knowledge.

Cat has lived in Tokyo and Berlin

Cat has lived in Tokyo and Berlin

In my spare time, I’m a huge fan of electronic music, so there’s nothing I love more than seeing my favourite DJs at festivals and events. This goes well with my passion for travelling; catching a music festival is a great excuse to see a new place. If you’ve never been to a music festival abroad before, it should definitely be on your bucket list. I’m also a bit of a foodie, so I’m always looking for new and interesting restaurants and recipes.

I love writing about new places and experiences. I enjoy sharing my insights and recommendations for nightlife, food and must-see destinations.